Trippy Egyptian sleeve progress

 Been working away on this colorfull patterned Egyptian sleeve  it’s an abstract depiction of Anubis and a woman releasing birds into the sky and beyoned framed with the river Nile and the sun , all fully healed here except the small freehand wrist section joining the hand and sleeve /

when fully completed better photos to come   
Scarab beetle on hand fully healed 

  River Nile and traditional Egyptian pattern cuff  
Anubis with sun and cosmos  backdrop

   
Mind boggling but an enjoyable project

Cheers for the trust Steve 👍🏻

Work ,work ,work

Here’s is some ongoing and recent work 

Healed lower  legsleeve from the summer , small extension to the top  
 Dragon legsleeve rear ,on the go … 
Finishing up on this one , healed photos soon  

 
And started another mammoth back piece

   
 And made another sitting on this dissolution themed Rams skull 

Leg sleeve in progress……

This leg sleeve is based on a Kuniyoshi print depicting sea creatures from the sea kingdom  attacking a pearl diver who has stolen a magical pearl  .more photos to follow 

    
  
 
This is in progress, I love doing worked based on these old prints , which all Japanese tattooing stems from .In Japanese mythology, the tide jewels– individually, the kanju (干珠?, lit. “(tide-)ebbing jewel”) and manju (満珠?, lit. “(tide-)flowing jewel”)– were magical gems that the Sea God used to control the tides. Classical Japanese history texts record an ancient myth that the ocean kami Watatsumi 海神 “sea god” or Ryūjin 龍神 “dragon god” presented the kanju and manju to his demigod son-in-law Hoori, and a later legend that Empress Jingū used the tide jewels to conquer Korea. Tide jewels interrelate Japanese dragons and wani sea-monsters, Indonesian mythology, the nyoi-ju 如意珠 “cintamani; wish-fulfilling jewel” in Japanese Buddhism.